Trevor Gardner

  • Assistant Professor of Law

Contact

Phone: (206) 221-2995
Email: tgard@uw.edu

Education

J.D. 2003, Harvard University Ph.D 2014, University of California, Berkeley B.A. 1999, University of Michigan

Curriculum Vitae

Areas of Expertise

Criminal Law and Procedure — Police Governance — Police Accountability — Criminal Federalism — Local Immigration Enforcement — Sociology of Crime

Recent Courses

LAW A 505 Criminal Law
LAW A 572 Criminal Justice Policy Seminar
LAW B 515 Criminal Procedure: Investigation

Selected Publications

  • Trevor G. Gardner, Immigrant Sanctuary as the “Old Normal”: A Brief History of Police Federalism, Colum. L. Rev. (forthcoming).

See the full list under the Publications tab below.

Trevor Gardner is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Washington School of Law. Professor Gardner writes in the area of criminal justice with a focus on policing. His research addresses a variety of related topics including racial profiling, community control of police, racial peer-group identification among African-American police officers, and decriminalization movements among local governments.

After completing undergraduate studies at the University of Michigan, Professor Gardner earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he served as Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal. He then worked as a trial attorney at the District of Columbia Public Defender Service, litigating juvenile and adult criminal cases from presentment through disposition.

Professor Gardner left criminal practice to join academia, earning his master's and doctoral degrees in Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the University of Michigan Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research, the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies, the UC Chancellor, the UC Berkeley Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy, and the Prison University Project.

Peer Reviewed Journals & Law Reviews

  • Speaker, "Presidential Power in Criminal Justice: Criminal Law and Procedure", Presidential Power and the Law, Women's University Club of Seattle (March 7, 2018)

  • Panelist, How We Police in America: A Case for Reform, University of Washington School of Law (May 4, 2017)

  • Panelist, How We Police in America: A Case for Reform, University of Washington School of Law (May 4, 2017)

  • Panelist, "Criminal Law", Presidential Power in 2017, University of Washington School of Law and Town Hall (February 1, 2017)

  • Speaker, "Immigrant Sanctuary and the Return of Federalist Penology", Annual Meeting, Law and Society Association (May 28, 2015)

  • Speaker, "Promoting Police Transparency in "Excessive Force" Cases", Institute of Judicial Administration Public Policy Series, New York University School of Law (March 1, 2015)

  • Speaker, "A Conversation on Police and Community Relations", White & Case, LLP (February 28, 2015)

  • Speaker, "The American Sanctuary: Where Combative Federalism Meets Criminal Justice Reform", Culp Colloquium, Duke Law School (January 1, 2015)

  • Speaker, "Immigrant Sanctuary as Collective Enforcement-Noncooperation: Rethinking the Consequences of Illegitimacy in Criminal Administration", Annual Meeting, American Sociological Association (August 10, 2013)

  • Speaker, "Federalism and the American Penal State", Annual Conference, Social Science History Association (November 1, 2012)

  • Speaker, "Policing a Nation: Federalist Governance and Criminal Administration in America", Annual Meeting, American Society of Criminology (November 1, 2012)

  • Speaker, "Federalism and the American Penal State: A Sociological Account of Federal Interventions into Local Criminal Administration", Annual Meeting, American Sociological Association (August 18, 2012)

  • Presider, "Thematic Session: Race and Racial Justice", Annual Meeting, American Sociological Association (August 17, 2012)