UW Law in the Media

  • The judges will “split into different groupings in different cases, just based on how each person understands the law and what the right understanding of the law is,” Spitzer said. As for the justices’ judicial approaches, Spitzer said the Court tends to split almost 50/50 in leaning “activist” — aiming to change or improve the law through rulings, such as in cases relating to social justice — or “conservative.”
  • Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Chair Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., convened the hearing with experts from the University of Washington School of Law, Mozilla, the AI Now Institute and ACT: the App Association to discuss the need to set a nationwide framework for how companies collect, use and share consumers' personal information and "why AI is an accelerant that increases the need for passing [such data privacy] legislation soon."
  • The Senate hearing will feature testimony from Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington School of Law and co-director of the University of Washington Tech Policy Lab; Amba Kak, co-executive director of the AI Now Institute; and Udbhav Tiwari, director of global product policy at Mozilla.
  • If the court decides that the remedy is simply more divestitures in Washington, “that would be a win for Kroger and a loss, as far as I can tell, for the state, because the state doesn’t want the deal to go through, period,” said Doug Ross, an antitrust expert at the University of Washington School of Law.
  • If the court decides that the remedy is simply more divestitures in Washington, “that would be a win for Kroger and a loss, as far as I can tell, for the state, because the state doesn’t want the deal to go through, period,” said Doug Ross, an antitrust expert at the University of Washington School of Law.
  • Academics researching online misinformation in the US are learning a hard lesson: Academic freedom cannot be taken for granted. They face a concerted effort—including by members of Congress—to undermine or silence their work documenting false and misleading internet content. The claim is that online misinformation researchers are trying to silence conservative voices. The evidence suggests just the opposite.
  • The landmark decision could alter legal precedent in our nation. We're getting expert insight into what exactly this ruling means and what's next. Jessica West, lecturer of law at the UW, is interviewed.
  • The broader context of today’s decision, said Sanne Knudsen, professor of environmental law at the University of Washington, is that the Supreme Court seems to be on a deregulatory trend. She pointed to two separate cases challenging the Clean Water Act’s interpretation of the “waters of the United States.”
  • The Supreme Court cleared the way Thursday for Idaho hospitals to provide emergency abortions, for now, in a procedural order that left key questions unanswered and could mean the issue ends up before the conservative-majority court again soon. Jessica West, lecturer of law at the UW, is interviewed.
  • The rule offers further pathways for tribes to proactively protect certain public lands. Monte Mills, professor of law and director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted.
  • When UW law professor Kim Ambrose and a group of her students arrived at the Patricia H. Clark Children & Family Justice Center last month to lead a legal rights workshop, they were turned away.
  • In March, the Washington Supreme Court approved, in concept, additional pathways to the bar involving supervised practice. No implementation dates have been finalized. “It is strange that the legal profession allows you to go to school, take a bunch of tests while in school and after school and never talk to a client—and that’s our current model,” says Tamara F. Lawson, dean of the University of Washington School of Law. Supervised practice “is more closely linked to competence than any 100 multiple-choice questions will ever be.”
  • “It’s not a corrupt system,” West said in an interview. “It’s a good and strong system. There are 12 jurors and (the defense) needed to convince only one of them to win. That’s it. They had a chance to present their testimony. Mr. Trump could have testified if he wanted to. There were lots of protections in place.”
  • "This is a very strong case of appropriation of likeness," Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, told The Information's The Briefing newsletter.
  • Lunar landings by China, India and Japan have catapulted Asia to the forefront of the space domain, and fuelled talk of a new space race. Their rise has also generated arguments both for and against multipolarity in the international space order.
  • Whether Bird could actually constitutionally declare homelessness a state of emergency and subsequently use the emergency powers of the governor’s office to address that declaration is unclear. University of Washington law school professor Hugh Spitzer, a leading state constitution scholar, thinks it is unlikely Bird could actually make such a move. “[Article 3 Section 8] simply tells us that the Governor is the commander in chief of the state militia. But the specifics of the Governor’s powers are set out in Chap. 38.08 RCW. But that statute gives the Governor strong powers re the militia (now the National Guard) only in the event of an invasion or insurrection,” Spitzer said.
  • Forcing TikTok to shut down its American operations over unspecified national security concerns would represent a violation of the First Amendment, according to six legal scholars surveyed by NPR. Ryan Calo, professor of law and in the Information School at the UW, is quoted.
  • One of the challenges in regulating AI can be summarized by a quote from Ryan Calo of the University of Washington School of Law, which Dayanim includes in his presentation: “AI isn’t a thing, like a train, but rather a set of techniques aimed at approximating some aspect of cognition.”
  • "The broad lessons here are a long way off, but this is clearly a really important time when the very first of these tech cases is going to be decided," said University of Washington antitrust professor Douglas Ross. "I do think they're going to be interested in how narrowly or broadly [the judge] defines the markets here," Ross added, "and if there is any learning in what he writes that might have application elsewhere."
  • UW Tribal Clinic students are in their second or third year of law school and hope to practice in some capacity in Native American communities. Stacey Lara, assistant teaching professor at the university, said that the focus of the Public Defense Clinic is to strengthen tribal justice systems and ultimately strengthen tribal sovereignty. “We find that many law schools focus on state and federal law, [but] there is a third sovereign, and that is the tribes,” said Lara. “And so, in seeking to enrich the students’ understanding of tribal sovereignty and being prepared to work in tribal communities, we have a comparative approach to some of what we do.”
  • The tech moguls behind the Hill and Valley Forum are expanding beyond TikTok, prepping a proposal to dismantle President Biden’s artificial intelligence rules.
  • Federal auto regulators announced Friday they are opening an investigation into the safety of Tesla’s Autopilot feature, less than a week after a Tesla driver believed to be using it allegedly struck and killed a motorcyclist in Monroe. Ryan Calo, professor of law and in the Information School at the UW, is quoted.
  • Ryan Calo, professor of law and in the Information School at the UW and co-director of the Tech Policy Lab, discusses the legality and impact of a potential TikTok ban.
  • The Washington State Patrol is investigating a fatal crash where the driver claims his Tesla was on autopilot when it fatally struck a motorcyclist. Ryan Calo, professor of law and in the Information School at the UW, is quoted.
  • For example, a large company might overcharge a million people an extra $5 for their purchases. It’s unlikely that anyone would sue the company over $5, but collectively, the business stole $5 million from its customers – more than enough to justify a lawsuit, says Jeff Feldman, professor from practice at the University of Washington School of Law.