posted Nov 15, 2018

Law students receive support from leading Puget Sound area businesses, organizations, law firms to increase diversity in legal profession

The University of Washington School of Law is proud to announce the 2018–19 Gregoire Fellows: Dayton Campbell-Harris, Jason Grube, Dailey Koga, Quynh La, Ted Lee, Paula Luu, Selena Ng, Mary Anastasia Ruffin and Mackenzie Stewart.

Since 2015, the Gregoire Fellows program has attracted diverse and talented students to UW Law and connected them with leading Puget Sound area businesses, governmental organizations and law firms committed to increasing diversity in the legal profession.

The fellows program is a unique partnership between UW Law and the legal community in Washington that works to ensure the legal profession reflects the incredible diversity in our society, said Mario L. Barnes, Toni Rembe Dean of the UW School of Law.

“At UW Law, we celebrate and embrace diversity in all its forms – whether life experiences, social background, worldview or professional interests,” Barnes said. “The Gregoire Fellows program reflects this commitment to inclusive excellence and helps place our students in the best position to have impact within Washington state and beyond.”

As part of the fellows program, students receive paid summer internships, which split their summer work assignments between a placement within a participating law firm, and a corporate legal department or governmental entity after the first year of law school. Students also receive scholarship aid and financial assistance for bar exam preparation. Additionally, the fellows participate in a mentorship program with former Washington Governor Christine Gregoire.

The program is made possible thanks to generous support from our sponsors, Amazon, Davis Wright Tremaine, Foster Pepper, K&L Gates, King County Prosecutor’s Office, Lane Powell, Littler Mendelson, Microsoft, Miller Nash Graham & Dunn, Nintendo, Orrick, Perkins Coie, Seattle Genetics, Starbucks, Stoel Rives, Vulcan, Washington State Attorney General’s Office, and Weyerhaeuser.


Meet the 2018 Gregoire Fellows

Dayton Campbell-Harris

Dayton Campbell-Harris

B.A., History and International Relations, Pacific Lutheran University

Motivated by his undergraduate studies, Campbell-Harris began working with the Low Income Housing Institute as an Advocacy and Program Coordinator shortly after graduation. There he acted as a representative for the organization speaking out at various public forums, advocating for some of Seattle’s most vulnerable citizens. Behind the scenes, he assisted organizing volunteers for programs servicing LIHI’s many properties across the Puget Sound region.

“In an increasingly interconnected and diversifying country, it is essential that the legal profession develop with it,” Campbell-Harris said. “The Gregoire Fellows program helps do just that. Assisting in the cultivation of tomorrow’s leaders, I am excited to continue growing intellectually alongside my peers as we work towards progressing the global common good.”


Jason Grube

Jason Grube

B.S., Education, Pennsylvania State University

Grube joins the University of Washington School of Law community after working for a national medical diagnostics laboratory, specializing in providing advanced diagnostics to federally qualified health centers and local health care providers. Before transitioning to the civilian sector, Grube served as an Infantry officer in the U.S. Army. He has served on numerous boards and commissions throughout the South Sound tasked with combating homelessness and assisting indigent veterans.

“I am honored to be a Gregoire Fellow and humbled by the opportunity,” Grube said. “I look forward to working with the 2018 Fellows, those who have come before us, and the Gregoire sponsors as we work to better the Seattle legal community by providing our diverse perspectives.”


Dailey Koga

Dailey Koga

B.A., Economics, Pacific University

Koga interned for U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR), where she researched economic and healthcare issues. She completed her senior thesis on the intersection of gender inequality and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, emphasizing the role women play in helping developing countries reduce extreme poverty. Koga spent the last three years working at a private equity firm in Oregon.

“The experience I will gain as a Gregoire Fellow will allow me to develop the skills required to be an effective legal advocate, so that upon graduation I can extend my knowledge and assistance to those in need,” Koga said. “I am excited about working with legal professionals and fellow students who share the desire to improve society and to diversify an important profession.”


Quynh La

Quynh La

B.A., Political Science, New York University 
M.A., Political Science, New York University

With a concentration in comparative politics, La conducted research on similarities between Turkey and Thailand’s military coups and their effects on democracy. Before returning to the west coast, she worked in Gibney, Anthony & Flaherty, LLP’s IP department as a Brand Protection Specialist, protecting clients’ IP rights through online anti-counterfeiting programs.

“As a first-generation law student and daughter of Vietnamese refugees, I am honored to have been selected as a Gregoire Fellow,” La said. “For me, diversity, justice, and progress go hand in hand, and while I am unsure where my legal career will lead, I know my commitment to those principles will guide my way. As a political science major, I know that one of the main pillars of society is the legal system - the work we do today will set a path for tomorrow. I am excited and honored to be a part of that.”


Ted Lee

Ted Lee

B.A., cum laude, Political Science, University of Southern California 
B.S., cum laude, Policy, Planning and Development, University of Southern California

Lee served in the U.S. Marine Corps with a recognition from the Secretary of the Navy for his meritorious service. Lee’s time with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California cultivated his passion in advocating for equitable public policies, and he hopes to serve as a legal counsel for government agencies in the future.

“Changing the world starts with effecting progress that later prompts other positive changes,” Lee said. “Starting that journey requires prioritizing focus and talents to issues that I am most capable of solving, and the fellowship is excellently structured for that purpose. The internships will provide experiences to test my abilities and interests, and the mentorship sessions with Gov. Gregoire will allow time and space to learn about the real-life implications of leadership in solving social challenges.”


Paula Luu

Paula Luu

B.A., with honors, Political Science, University of Washington

Luu worked for the Washington State Bar Association as a regulatory analyst where she audited lawyers and educational providers to ensure their compliance with mandatory continuing legal education requirements. She discovered her desire to attend law school as an undergraduate while working for Student Legal Services, an on-campus law office that exclusively serves UW students. She is originally from Renton and hopes to stay and practice in the greater Seattle area.

“As an underrepresented minority, I feel it is my responsibility to advocate for other individuals who aspire to break into this profession which has historically struggled to keep pace with the growing diversity in our community,” Luu said. “I plan to use the connections and skills gained from this incredible experience to demonstrate how diversity is essential at all levels of the profession and that we can accomplish more when the people working within it more accurately reflect the population we serve.”


Selena Ng

Selena Ng

B.S., Business Administration, University of Southern California

Ng worked at Cox, Castle & Nicholson, LLP in Los Angeles as a civil litigation clerk where she specialized in employing e-discovery software to facilitate pre-trial procedures. She assisted partners in navigating each stage of the litigation process, from reviewing discovery documents to assembling materials for alternative dispute resolution. Throughout college, she interned at entertainment companies, including NBC Universal and Sony Music, working in music licensing and marketing.

“As the daughter of a small-business owner, I am dedicated to utilizing the experience I gain as a Gregoire Fellow to transform the entrepreneurial landscape,” Ng said. “I believe in harnessing the power of businesses to solve our most pressing social issues, like climate change and income inequality. By working with legal professionals representing social enterprises, I hope to learn from their expertise and apply this knowledge to help businesses navigate the laws governing socially-driven organizations.”


Mary Anastasia Ruffin

Mary Anastasia Ruffin

B.A.,Political Science and Law, Societies and Justice, University of Washington

At the University of Washington, Ruffin served as a Senator for ASUW and aided in diversity efforts on campus. Ruffin continued her work in advocacy at King County Sexual Assault Resource Center and has successfully advocated for government funding on behalf of formally homeless residents in Seattle. Recently, she partnered with other leaders in her community to form a coalition aimed at empowering marginalized groups.

“The opportunity to represent my community as a Gregoire Fellow is an absolute privilege,” Ruffin said. “I am tremendously enthusiastic about the prospect of gaining the experience, relationships and mentorship critical to my legal career. The need for diversity and inclusion in the legal profession is paramount now more than ever and I am eager to be a part the solution.”


Mackenzie Stewart

Mackenzie Stewart

B.A., magna cum laude, Anthropology and International Studies, University of Kentucky

Stewart joins the University of Washington Law community after her work in the Holly Park neighborhood of Seattle to support Immigrant and Refugee Youth. In her role, she served as community connector, connecting resources to the people who need them most. Her work built bonds between students, volunteers, and community partners to increase community ownership and sustainability.

“I am inspired by the Gregoire Fellows program’s commitment to adding a diversity of voices in our legal community and I hope to use my legal practice to advocate and empower others to do the same,” Stewart said.